part three: expanse, project four: perspective

exercise two: angular perspective

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While I love a daily whinge about living in France, the Alps are just a few hours drive away so sometimes I need to bite my tongue.

Thankfully the view from the window incorporates the corner of a chalet apartment block so I’ve been able to jump forward to this exercise. img_2256I’m hoping to multi-task and also get ‘groups of trees’ done here too, but since the first day here the mountain and its trees have all but disappeared – why the facing page above is blank – it’s simply gone.

 

 

 

 

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Back home and I’ve had another go at angular perspective. The corner of this building is very close, across a narrow road. It’s very tall, and I am just about at the level of the roof. I had to sit and stand to get more than just the top floor in, which moves my eyeline and is probably why there are some issues with the lower floors!

After an initial sketch I checked my lines of perspective, they weren’t too far off – though the angle of the lower floors was sharper than I had made out.

Things I’ve discovered:

  • that once you start using the lines of perspective it’s hard to know when to stop
  • while the width of the windows narrowed dramatically the further away, the facing wall of the alcove reduced far less.
  • there are rules of curves disappearing into the distance that I need to discover!
  • these lines help ‘fix’ the verticals, but what about the widths of the windows?

The temptation when I start using a ruler to draw in these lines is to take the ruler to every line, but a drawing where all lines are made by ruler becomes very flat and lifeless, so I’ve ended up with a mix of the two – which also a bit odd. I think if I was to tackle something like this again I would mark my start and end points, and then draw all my lines free hand, as a compromise.

I didn’t have a great deal of patience for this exercise and I rushed in to it. An exercise like this obviously needs more planning before jumping in with the ink.

 

 

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